"Do unto others before they do unto you."

 

Preemptive attack on countries like Iran is crucial if there are not to be terrorists bombs going off murdering millions of people.  It is the moral thing to do.  This idea became policy after 9/11 during the Bush administration. 

The main elements of the Bush Doctrine were delineated in a document, the National Security Strategy of the United States, published on September 17, 2002.  According to the document:

The security environment confronting the United States today is radically different from what we have faced before. Yet the first duty of the United States Government remains what it always has been: to protect the American people and American interests. It is an enduring American principle that this duty obligates the government to anticipate and counter threats, using all elements of national power, before the threats can do grave damage. The greater the threat, the greater is the risk of inaction – and the more compelling the case for taking anticipatory action to defend ourselves, even if uncertainty remains as to the time and place of the enemy’s attack. There are few greater threats than a terrorist attack with WMD.

To forestall or prevent such hostile acts by our adversaries, the United States will, if necessary, act preemptively in exercising our inherent right of self-defense. The United States will not resort to force in all cases to preempt emerging threats. Our preference is that nonmilitary actions succeed. And no country should ever use preemption as a pretext for aggression.

This doctrine was condemned by many who saw it as leading to unnecessary war.  Whether or not unnecessary wars were fought the basis of the doctrine is true.

 

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